GRB 221009A: The Boat

DOI: 
10.3847/2041-8213/acc39c
Publication date: 
13/03/2023
Main author: 
Burns, Eric
IAA authors: 
Agüí Fernández, José Feliciano
Authors: 
Burns, Eric;Svinkin, Dmitry;Fenimore, Edward;Kann, D. Alexander;Agüí Fernández, José Feliciano;Frederiks, Dmitry;Hamburg, Rachel;Lesage, Stephen;Temiraev, Yuri;Tsvetkova, Anastasia;Bissaldi, Elisabetta;Briggs, Michael S.;Dalessi, Sarah;Dunwoody, Rachel;Fletcher, Cori;Goldstein, Adam;Hui, C. Michelle;Hristov, Boyan A.;Kocevski, Daniel;Lysenko, Alexandra L.;Mailyan, Bagrat;Mangan, Joseph;McBreen, Sheila;Racusin, Judith;Ridnaia, Anna;Roberts, Oliver J.;Ulanov, Mikhail;Veres, Peter;Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.;Wood, Joshua
Journal: 
The Astrophysical Journal
Publication type: 
Article
Volume: 
946
Pages: 
L31
Abstract: 
GRB 221009A has been referred to as the brightest of all time (BOAT). We investigate the veracity of this statement by comparing it with a half century of prompt gamma-ray burst observations. This burst is the brightest ever detected by the measures of peak flux and fluence. Unexpectedly, GRB 221009A has the highest isotropic-equivalent total energy ever identified, while the peak luminosity is at the ~99th percentile of the known distribution. We explore how such a burst can be powered and discuss potential implications for ultralong and high-redshift gamma-ray bursts. By geometric extrapolation of the total fluence and peak flux distributions, GRB 221009A appears to be a once-in-10,000-year event. Thus, it is almost certainly not the BOAT over all of cosmic history; it may be the brightest gamma-ray burst since human civilization began.
Database: 
ADS
URL: 
https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/#abs/2023ApJ...946L..31B/abstract
ADS Bibcode: 
2023ApJ...946L..31B
Keywords: 
Gamma-ray bursts;Gamma-ray transient sources;Gamma-ray sources;Jets;Core-collapse supernovae;629;1853;633;870;304;Astrophysics - High Energy Astrophysical Phenomena